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ねえねえ
July 24, 2017 3:08 am

For those who'd need a visual of when Real Ciel appeared in the childhood flashbacks and when Our Ciel did:

Our:
http://pic.mangapicgallery.com/r/album/82/raw_/162_1784607.jpg

Real:
http://pic.mangapicgallery.com/r/album/82/raw_/162_1784608.jpg

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ねえねえ
July 24, 2017 2:26 am

Just found a goldmine of info for manga publishing contracts and conditions, the original blog post from the mangaka was posted in June 6th, so the info should be quite up to date :). So for anyone interested, here it is:

By Shuuhou Satou

The other day, I was asked by a newbie trying to enter the manga scene: “When attempting to serialize a new work, what is the market rate for a standard serialization, and what kinds of contracts will I require?” As a newcomer to the scene not yet familiar with how our world operates, I believed they wanted to know what and how far they should push for when negotiating with publishers. I met and spoke with them about various things, and since I believe that this is important information for budding artists who intend to become mangaka in the future, I will reproduce my thoughts here.

First, let’s talk about market rates for standard serializations.

Compared to ten years ago, the rates for serializations have gone down. I do not know the rates for every serialization in every single publishing company so I cannot claim to know the exact details. However, I have heard tell that even at major publishers, newcomers are only paid around US$50 per page (even for color pages!). This is, on average, more than $10 less than what it was 10 years ago. In the past, a newcomer would receive a minimum of $70 per page for a magazine serialization. Today, however, it feels like the market rate is about $50 to $60 per page. There are a few editorial departments who will pay over $100 per page, but these are few and far between.

These numbers are only accurate when discussing magazine publishing companies. Recently, the amount of manga being published for reading through the apps of web-based publishing companies has increased, and they pay even less. A certain well known app beginning with ‘C’ pays $500 per chapter. In the event that there is an artist as well as an author, they have to split the $500. Monthly publisher ‘G’, despite having a quota of dozens of pages, pays a fixed sum ranging from $1000 to $2000, with potential bonuses of a few hundred dollars more if the manga proves popular.

Essentially, neither serialization in magazines nor on web applications will lead to very much money, and the pay might not even be enough for your living expenses. It is possible to lock yourself in your room and keep working, intoxicated on the image of yourself working as a professional mangaka despite not making any money, but sooner or later you will burn yourself out.

As for the necessary legal contracts, I believe that the following three types of contracts are the ones most typically used in the industry.

The first are the types you make with the publisher (or tech company).

The second are made for working with other staff members on a project.

The third are the type made between the author(s) and artist(s) in the event that there is more than one creator involved.

First, the writing contract.

This contract details the methods for receiving payment when your work is serialized in the magazine (or application), as well as the responsibilities related to publication. It may be difficult to imagine for those who work in normal companies, but in the manga world, it isn’t unusual to have cases where the editing department makes an artist draw a chapter, and then decides to neither publish the chapter nor pay the artist. “Pay up! Publish my work! No cancelling the series until this contract expires!” That’s the kind of contract this is.

At the moment, no publishing company is willing to provide a sample contract. The typical business process (aka common sense) of “Commission -> Quote -> Contract -> Order” does not apply to publishers. The artists themselves have to go to the publisher and ask for a “writing contract”. It is natural to wonder, “When will we negotiate the contract?”, when talking about serializations. However formal contracts are not the norm, so please request for one yourself. Doing so will likely shock the publisher and make them wonder, “Where did he find out about that?!”

Next up is the publishing contract, which is necessary in the event that your serialization has been progressing smoothly and has been selected to be released in volumes. In this case, it has become the norm for publishers to present a contract. As the contract differs from publisher to publisher, I won’t post examples. It mainly discusses giving the publisher exclusive rights, royalties, adaptations, commercialization, and secondary use rights.

The most critical thing to keep in mind when negotiating this contract is that you are signing a publishing contract, with the publishing referring to that of print publishing only. You must ensure that you do not allow the publisher to monopolize the rights for electronic publishing or secondary use. The publisher will also want electronic publishing rights, as well as the the freedom to manage secondary use rights as they please. It makes it easier for them to manage as well as to make money.

The basic contract they provide will of course contain clauses which surrender these rights to them, which is why it is important to request beforehand that such clauses be removed from the contract. It is absolutely critical to limit their rights to print publishing only and to keep the rights to manage the branding of your series for yourself.

Is it really possible for a newcomer publishing their first work to make such a request? It is.

I conduct all of my communication with my editor through e-mail, meaning all business negotiations are also done through email. This has the benefit of leaving no opportunity for “he said, she said” arguments in the future.

Carrying on. While newcomers are indeed able to request this, whether or not the publisher accedes is another story. Print publishing is a declining industry, so they will be reluctant to give up any rights within their reach. Even if you attempt to compromise by saying, “Okay, I’ll give you management rights in exchange for a higher royalty fee for electronic publication”, they will be unlikely to budge. Do your best.

The editor-in-chief and assistant editor-in-chief will come out in order to persuade you. If you still resist, they will begin to say things like, “You’re the only newcomer demanding things like this”, “We can’t give you special treatment”, “It sounds like you’re saying that you don’t want to be serialized at all”, and “How dare you bring this up now, after all that we (the editing department) have done for you? That wasn’t part of the agreement.” in order to gently intimidate you.

Through this you will learn that the manga world is not one filled with dreams, but a system with a carefully managed balance of power. Whether or not you allow yourself to be chained down by it is up to you.

Additionally, it is quite rare for a publishing contract to be signed at the beginning of serialization. Publishers want to release volumes if the product becomes popular. However, they don’t want to shoulder the risk if the product isn’t popular, meaning they will hold off on signing a contract until the last minute. This means that newcomers will continue to create and publish their work without knowing whether or not volumes will be released. Still, it is probably better to consider the fact that contracts are being offered at all as a move in the right direction. Of course, you can also request a publishing contract at the beginning of serialization. If you do so, then they will say things like “You’re the only newcomer asking for things like this” to gently intimidate you. If you are interested in enlisting someone to assist you in these negotiations, please contact me. I can introduce you to a professional.

The rest of the blog post for the two other types of contracts is there: http://helveticascans.com/blog/contracts

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  • tokidoki
    July 24, 2017 5:00 am

    Interesting information!

  • ,Reality bites July 24, 2017 12:22 pm

    It is interesting, far more complex than I thought. answers a lot of questions for me thanks.

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ねえねえ
September 27, 2016 6:21 am

I'm being random right here, but I'm curious, has this happened to anyone here? xD

I woke up last night, and because I somehow managed to sleep on it without waking up (probably from sleepwalking, I always turn off my alarm clock in my sleep which is quite a pain, and I'm an excessively deep sleeper lol) and my left arm was DEAD ASLEEP. It was all wobbly, I didn't sense it when I touched it and I couldn't move it at all. Literally paralyzed, as I basically pressured its nerves so my brain thought I just lost it or something lol. Thankfully, that only lasted about a minute, but I sure was scared xD.

One of the most freakyish experiences I've ever had. Makes you appreciate having two arms and having a fully working body!

1 1
  • Hanne
    September 27, 2016 6:46 am

    I have had that, unfortunately it was Carpal Tunnel Syndrome though, and I had to go through three surgeries to release the pressure on my nerves. (Imagine having that feeling coming and going day and night for months - but worse at night) Glad you are okay, you probably pinched the nerve a bit while sleeping.

  • ねえねえ
    September 27, 2016 7:53 am
    I have had that, unfortunately it was Carpal Tunnel Syndrome though, and I had to go through three surgeries to release the pressure on my nerves. (Imagine having that feeling coming and going day and night fo... Hanne

    Ouch, sure sucks :(. At least it's totally fixed now?

    I freaked out because I had no idea that this could happen aha. I thought that maybe I actually managed to kill it (lol) but then it started to slowly come back. But it ended up being more silly and an interesting experience than anything lol.

    I should really start to take an interest in medicine or something, I didn't even know about stretch marks until I got them recently from quick weight gain. Like what the hell. Can't I learn about those things before I get it? What about when I'll get something much more serious?

    I'm starting to get a bit paranoid each time something like that, totally unexpected happens lol. Why's school not keeping up with the new realities... We're past the point where learning the names of rock types is of most significance ._.

  • Hanne
    September 27, 2016 8:46 am
    Ouch, sure sucks :(. At least it's totally fixed now? I freaked out because I had no idea that this could happen aha. I thought that maybe I actually managed to kill it (lol) but then it started to slowly come ... ねえねえ

    It's mostly fixed - I still have numb episodes, but not on the same scale.
    I find that experience is a greater teacher than just reading about it. But we need a wide base of basic knowledge to help understand new things, so learning the names of rocks and such is never a waste of time, who knows when you will need it.

  • ねえねえ
    September 27, 2016 9:36 am
    It's mostly fixed - I still have numb episodes, but not on the same scale.I find that experience is a greater teacher than just reading about it. But we need a wide base of basic knowledge to help understand ne... Hanne

    Mmmh, maybe. But being a visual learner, school hasn't done much for my basic knowledge. I had to study-dump all the time because I wasted so much time in class and had to study everything myself at home, but there is only so much time in a day after the whole "sit in class and try to listen". Lectures are a waste on me, I think in pictures, and unless it's practical/actually interesting my brain just dishes it out as soon as it gets the chance.

    Of course, I don't know the names of the types of rocks. I only know I studied it at one point, as it is with most of my high school years xD. And I got extremely good grades, only thanks to my last minute studying skills.

    I got 95% in my last history class. I don't even know the years the two world wars started. I just figured out what the teacher wanted me to throw at his tests and memorized all of it only hours before by reading and reciting my notes in a certain order. Basically I recalled where on my sheet note I put each concepts and was able to see what I should write that way. And even then, I had trouble sometimes, especially for naming things, as well I have to translate my "pictures" in "words", I don't think firstly in words, so if it's something that wasn't on my sheet...

    It's good for auditory-sequential learners. My boyfriend is basically an encyclopedia on two legs when it comes to random science anatomy etc. facts as he just remembers everything he hears basically. He was my saving grace in my last school years actually, as after each lectures I was like "so, how do I do that? 8)". Even when I actually listened...

    But for others... An utter waste of time.

  • ねえねえ
    September 27, 2016 10:01 am

    The worst is that they all have the same setting. How am I supposed to remember anything when I have no way of figuring out a visual difference, as a 100% visual-spatial learner is beyond me. I'd remember better if the walls changed colors each class. I could be like "oh, I remember that was when the class was red that we saw that, and that as well, so they're related" etc. LOL.

    The struggle :P

  • Hanne
    September 27, 2016 4:43 pm
    The worst is that they all have the same setting. How am I supposed to remember anything when I have no way of figuring out a visual difference, as a 100% visual-spatial learner is beyond me. I'd remember bette... ねえねえ

    ლ(´ڡ`ლ)

  • SunManju September 27, 2016 5:53 pm

    That moment on a test, when you remember where on a page a piece of info was, but not WHAT it is :'D (╯°Д °)╯╧╧

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  1. Indigo
    October 8, 2016 3:12 am

    Actually, memorizing the strokes' order is tedious though there are rules and guidelines which govern this. This is totally optional though; I even doubt that Japanese language learners memorize them anyhow (=・ω・=), except for students who majored or are majoring in Japanese language study.
    I am glad that you can learn from videos; they're definitely going to be inserted into my curriculum in the future.
    I believe that looking up a character by its radical is handier than doing it by the SKIP method. As an utter beginner, I've totally relied on the SKIP method. It is very useful when you're looking at a scanned page and part of the kanji character is undecipherable; not to mention the blurriness of the furigana characters. In spite of that, I always manage to find the kanji in question, some way or the other, thanks to the SKIP method. However, this is going to be in the past now as I want to properly study the language first, then attempt to read Japanese text bit by bit. It is obvious that a systematic study of the language requires to learn and memorize all the kanjis' radicals.
    I hope that you're going to achieve fluency as time passes by; and perhaps when that point of time is reached we can have a conversation in Japanese. It is going to be difficult but yet achievable lol (づ ̄ ³ ̄)づ

    • Indigo
      October 8, 2016 3:13 am

      Oops. I forgot to hit the reply button before commenting so a new message post has been initiated. Sorry about that. (=・ω・=)

    • ねえねえ
      October 8, 2016 3:59 am
      Oops. I forgot to hit the reply button before commenting so a new message post has been initiated. Sorry about that. (=・ω・=) Indigo

      It's fine :P

      Ah, well I sure have no clue what to do with blurry kanjis sometimes lol. Sometimes I manage to guess and recognize a few radicals, but hey I'll try the SKIP for times where that doesn't work aha. For less blurry stuff, when it's on a picture and I can't copy it, sometimes I get lazy and use my cellphone to scan it aha. It came with the app Asahi Kanji. The bigger it is though the better it works.

      I just went through the radicals before jumping into reading, that's all there is to it ╮( ̄▽ ̄)╭

      There was a study carried out among university students that showed that there was an average of two strokes missing for more complex kanjis. Imo it's pretty much an art. They have to learn the order however, because when you write quickly, your letters tend to get cursive right? Learning the stroke order diminishes that effect, and people can better read them. It doesn't have to be perfect, but it's going to near unreadable if it's completely off.

      And yes, it's achievable~. Not necessarily difficult, it depends on how impatient you get aha. Personally I'm fine if it's under 10 years, though that's not to discourage you, I'm just not that always actively into it.

    • Indigo
      October 18, 2016 9:00 pm
      It's fine :PAh, well I sure have no clue what to do with blurry kanjis sometimes lol. Sometimes I manage to guess and recognize a few radicals, but hey I'll try the SKIP for times where that doesn't work aha. F... ねえねえ

      I am really sorry for the late reply. I was so busy that I didn't have the time to visit this website until now. LOL those blurry kanjis are a pain in the neck. Sometimes I try all the tricks up my sleeve but still at least 20 to 30% of them remain unidentified inside of a scanned page. There is a website (it is more than one actually) where you can find a kanji by drawing it (jisho.org for example) but it takes a longer time to find the missing kanji if the stroke order isn't right.
      Handwritten kanji is another nightmare. Eleven days ago I stumbled upon a handwritten text inside a manga which lasted for several pages. I almost had a heart attack because some of the hiragana and katakana weren't clear; never mind the kanjis because they looked like noodles pinned on a wall.
      I've heard that before - the part about 10 years - It is possibly correct that this is the lapse of time needed to become a great scholar in Japanese studies but I am pretty sure that advanced reading and communication could be achieved in two years of persistent studying (=・ω・=) ありがとうございまつ (you're hard working so you get the formal treatment lol (=・ω・=) )

  2. Indigo
    July 3, 2016 10:15 am

    Hello Lightasus,

    Sorry for barging in on you like that. However I remembered you because I read some of your posts last year, on learning Japanese. I've begun a self-study program myself. So what about you? Have you become able to read Japanese without an intermediary tool (such as Google translate or any similar gadget)? If yes, how long did it take you? Arigatô.

    • ねえねえ
      October 4, 2016 12:35 am

      Oops, just remembered I hadn't replied because I was too busy at the time and then forgot ( ̄∇ ̄")

      Depends on what you consider being able to read without an intermediary tool. I'd say I can understand half without it, and the other half I have to look for. But then again, there are still words I have to verify in English, and I would say I'm not so far from fluency. There will always be words you'll have to verify, there's always some obscure ones.

      Mind you, I've taken a break from actively learning it. Other things took over my life in the last year. I will resume it as soon as possible however.

      But if you need some tips for language learning:

      1. As a general rule, we learn things better when they are related to our survival or our personal goals. Your brain will just pay attention to it better. So focus on language content that is relevant to you.

      2. Use the new language as a tool to communicate from Day 1. That's the mistake people make all the time that makes it that someone trying to learn a language may not even achieve fluency 10 years later.

      If you can't physically go in Japan, throw yourself into forums. Try exchanging with natives. That's what I did on this website 2 years ago, while I was half confident in my English, and my, I've improved A LOT. So much that I surprised myself being pretty comfortable with going through English job interviews!

      3. So, don't focus too much on memorizing this and that word. Don't be afraid of going through a dictionary all the time at first while trying to communicate or read. Your brain will memorize it better, because you actually use it fro something practical. When you first understand the message, you will unconsciously acquire the language. Much, much quicker.

      4. It's not about knowledge, especially for speaking. Someone in Japan can have A grades in English, drop in the USA, and find that they understand nothing. It's more like physiological training.

      5. Be relaxed and curious. Don't stress whenever you don't understand something 100%. Don't focus on being perfect, it'll come without you realizing it. I've first learned English through video games, since French translations were not available were I live at the time, and later I was already able to read and understand. That's because I focused on understanding the information rather than focusing on learning English.

      Also, if you're one of those like me who are visual learners, you may benefit from purchasing "The Easy Way to Learn 400 Practical Kanji". They basically explain how those 400 kanjis were come to be drawn the way they are today. So you can then begin to link the kanjis to pictures related to the meaning rather than trying to memorize a bunch of lines. I found that helped me have a basis, much, much quicker all of the sudden. I still remember most while it's been a year I haven't really touched Japanese much. Can't unsee it aha.

      That's pretty much it :)

    • Indigo
      October 5, 2016 10:53 am
      Oops, just remembered I hadn't replied because I was too busy at the time and then forgot ( ̄∇ ̄")Depends on what you consider being able to read without an intermediary tool. I'd say I can understand half ... ねえねえ

      This is an excellent explanation. I am glad that learning Japanese has worked out for you. Your English is excellent too, I couldn't have guessed that it isn't your native language if you hadn't told me so yourself. I will put your advises into good use. Thank you for your patience and time.

    • ねえねえ
      October 5, 2016 11:44 am
      This is an excellent explanation. I am glad that learning Japanese has worked out for you. Your English is excellent too, I couldn't have guessed that it isn't your native language if you hadn't told me so your... Indigo

      It's nothing ^^. And thanks ~

      I'm not sure how far you've gone, so in case that can help demystify the whole kanjis which can be seen as the big mountain. I often bring that up to people :3:

      Kanjis are made up of radicals. There are about 250 of them (not all are used at the same frequency, don't worry too much aha). They "mean" something, but not all can be used by themselves.

      Like, here's a kanji:


      Copy paste is somewhere else if it's too small lol. But it's kind of complex, right? 18 strokes.

      But here are the radicals it is made of:
      The radical grass, 艹
      The radical "inverted box" or "window frame", 冂
      The radical thread, 糸
      The radical insect, 虫

      繭 means cocoon.

      Now, sometimes only one radical holds meaning to the kanji. But yeah, what's cool is that you can often guess the meaning by recognizing them in kanjis.

      And how you recognize them? For me, it was the book I referenced you aha. But learning how they were drawn, much like hieroglyphs, in the first place, and how they were simplified in order to stylize the writing system. Then they also do the same with kanjis by mising them up and telling why as well. Asahi Kanji is also a good app that tests your recognition of the radicals, so I used that as well.

      When you have learned a good chunk of them, then kanjis suddenly start to all make sense.

      Now you can try to learn how they're said at the same time, or after. I don't think that after would be too much of a problem, whatever you enjoy most.

      I find kanjis really fun overall, it's like finally making sense of a coded language.
      ╮( ̄▽ ̄)╭

    • ねえねえ
      October 5, 2016 12:46 pm

      By the way, that’s what my own “self-study” program looked like, feel free to take what you want:

      1.Watching subtitled animes.
      Recognizing words often used subconciously. If you’ve been watching animes for at least a year, it’s probably enough. B-Baka!
      2.Learning hiraganas
      Takes about a day. I used Dr Moku. Same concept, mnemonics, the “can’t unsee” phenomena.
      3.Learning katakanas
      Same.
      4.Learning radicals
      Get through the book, tests.
      5.Learning a basis of kanjis
      Goes with “get through the book”. Don’t sweat learning a series a kanjis though.
      6.Start to read, communicate, have at it.
      Mangas are more friendly than novels, obviously, since there's less text and there are visuals to help understand the context. Use a dictionary and internet as long as you need, you’ll need it less and less as time goes by. Also get through the basics of the grammar, numbers, levels of politeness etc. I don’t have a specific place I can refer you that is in English, sadly. Start to use all of that acquired knowledge by participating in forums, write comments etc.
      7.At some point you may want to start watching animes, Japanese shows or youtubers without subtitles. You can’t really force it, and communicating in person in Japanese with someone is probably going to speed up when you’re going to be able to do that. Of course, if you can do that, do it as soon as possible. If not, enjoying animes and learning written Japanese with all the grammar and whatnot will probably make it click at some point. It was like that with English for me, at some point I just found out I could manage.

      Personal advice, don’t waste your time on learning the stroke order. I don’t know about you, but I never really write since I’ve been out of school, I only type, so I don’t see how pertinent it is to learn how to write kanjis in today's world with their specific stroke orders. Too much trouble for not much use. I doubt you’re going to need it either.

    • Indigo
      October 5, 2016 4:47 pm

      Your study program is very similar to mine. However it didn't occur to me to study the radicals because I don't rely on them to look up a character in a dictionary but on the SKIP method which consists of identifying the pattern to which belongs a Kanji character and the number of strokes of each part when the kanji is devised into two. This leads me to comment on the last part of your reply. Indeed, it is less cumbersome to memorize the strokes' order for each kanji but in my case doing the opposite thing caters to my taste because I practice calligraphy in my spare time and I am interested in learning Japanese calligraphy too. Your study program is quite logical; the only disadvantage I have compared to you is that I am not much of a listener. I can read and write for hours but when it comes to films and YouTube videos, I become restless. I can remain interested only for a few minutes hence I need to find some very short videos to watch in Japanese, and with subtitles, on a regular basis. It has been very generous to share your tips and how to's with me. Thank you again for your very much appreciated help and time (=・ω・=).

    • ねえねえ
      October 7, 2016 4:35 am
      Your study program is very similar to mine. However it didn't occur to me to study the radicals because I don't rely on them to look up a character in a dictionary but on the SKIP method which consists of ident... Indigo

      Ah, well if it's the way you prefer, then it's all good :). Depends on your goals ehe. I'm not too into calligraphy myself, so when they always systematically teach the stroke order I'm kind of not sure of what to do with it aha.

      The SKIP method I'm not a fan of at all, but I'd be tempted to think that's a matter of one's learning style. I'm very much a visual learner. Btw, not a listener either, but videos get my attention more, obviouslyヾ(❀╹◡╹)ノ~. I focus on learning unconsciously when it comes to oral speech, I just enjoy then content and try to understand the meaning.

      Though the big advantage, with all the radicals assimilated, is that you can better guess the meaning of the kanjis after. I didn't really learn them because of dictionary search, though I do happen to use it with them obviously aha. It came handy to me multiple times, and there's not that many radicals compared to the number of kanjis. But maybe that's useless to learners not leaning that much on the visual memory (I do happen to score very high on that type of IQ), that I can't tell.

      But if you're comfortable with your program as it is, don't change it, we do become fond of one technique or the other :). Whatever works in order to crack through kanjis aha.

The Finder Fan Formerly Known As
Lightasus

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